Anonymous asked:

You're a stupid nigger. You hate white people so much but without them you wouldn't have the McDonald's you so clearly love you fat fucking loser

unrivaledbeauty:

paranormal-blacktivity:

If it weren’t for black people you wouldn’t have:

  • air conditioning unit: Frederick M. Jones; July 12, 1949
  • almanac: Benjamin Banneker; Approx 1791
  • auto cut-off switch: Granville T. Woods; January 1,1839
  • auto fishing devise: G. Cook; May 30, 1899
  • automatic gear shift: Richard Spikes; February 28, 1932
  • baby buggy: W.H. Richardson; June 18, 1899
  • bicycle frame: L.R. Johnson; Octber 10, 1899
  • biscuit cutter: A.P. Ashbourne; November 30, 1875
  • blood plasma bag: Charles Drew; Approx. 1945
  • cellular phone: Henry T. Sampson; July 6, 1971
  • chamber commode: T. Elkins; January 3, 1897
  • clothes dryer: G. T. Sampson; June 6, 1862
  • curtain rod: S. R. Scratton; November 30, 1889
  • curtain rod support: William S. Grant; August 4, 1896
  • door knob: O. Dorsey; December 10, 1878
  • door stop: O. Dorsey; December 10, 1878
  • dust pan: Lawrence P. Ray; August 3, 1897
  • egg beater: Willie Johnson; February 5, 1884
  • electric lampbulb: Lewis Latimer; March 21, 1882
  • elevator: Alexander Miles; October 11, 1867
  • eye protector: P. Johnson; November 2, 1880
  • fire escape ladder: J. W. Winters; May 7, 1878
  • fire extinguisher: T. Marshall; October 26, 1872
  • folding bed: L. C. Bailey; July 18, 1899
  • folding chair: Brody & Surgwar; June 11, 1889
  • fountain pen: W. B. Purvis; January 7, 1890
  • furniture caster: O. A. Fisher; 1878
  • gas mask: Garrett Morgan; October 13, 1914
  • golf tee: T. Grant; December 12, 1899
  • guitar: Robert F. Flemming, Jr. March 3, 1886
  • hair brush: Lydia O. Newman; November 15,18–
  • hand stamp: Walter B. Purvis; February 27, 1883
  • horse shoe: J. Ricks; March 30, 1885
  • ice cream scooper: A. L. Cralle; February 2, 1897
  • improv. sugar making: Norbet Rillieux; December 10, 1846
  • insect-destroyer gun: A. C. Richard; February 28, 1899
  • ironing board: Sarah Boone; December 30, 1887
  • key chain: F. J. Loudin; January 9, 1894
  • lantern: Michael C. Harvey; August 19, 1884
  • lawn mower: L. A. Burr; May 19, 1889
  • lawn sprinkler: J. W. Smith; May 4, 1897
  • lemon squeezer: J. Thomas White; December 8, 1893
  • lock: W. A. Martin; July 23, 18–
  • lubricating cup: Ellijah McCoy; November 15, 1895
  • lunch pail: James Robinson; 1887
  • mail box: Paul L. Downing; October 27, 1891
  • mop: Thomas W. Stewart; June 11, 1893
  • motor: Frederick M. Jones; June 27, 1939
  • peanut butter: George Washington Carver; 1896
  • pencil sharpener: J. L. Love; November 23, 1897
  • record player arm: Joseph Hunger Dickenson January 8, 1819
  • refrigerator: J. Standard; June 14, 1891
  • riding saddles: W. D. Davis; October 6, 1895
  • rolling pin: John W. Reed; 1864
  • shampoo headrest: C. O. Bailiff; October 11, 1898
  • spark plug: Edmond Berger; February 2, 1839
  • stethoscope: Imhotep; Ancient Egypt
  • stove: T. A. Carrington; July 25, 1876
  • straightening comb: Madam C. J. Walker; Approx 1905
  • street sweeper: Charles B. Brooks; March 17, 1890
  • phone transmitter: Granville T. Woods; December 2, 1884
  • thermostat control: Frederick M. Jones; February 23, 1960
  • traffic light: Garrett Morgan; November 20, 1923
  • tricycle: M. A. Cherry; May 6, 1886
  • typewriter: Burridge & Marshman; April 7, 1885

BUT OH MAN WHAT WILL WE DO WITHOUT MCDONALDS :(((

This is the greatest response in history

Ferguson isn’t about black rage against cops. It’s white rage against progress.

When we look back on what happened in Ferguson, Mo., during the summer of 2014, it will be easy to think of it as yet one more episode of black rage ignited by yet another police killing of an unarmed African American male. But that has it precisely backward. What we’ve actually seen is the latest outbreak of white rage. Sure, it is cloaked in the niceties of law and order, but it is rage nonetheless.

Protests and looting naturally capture attention. But the real rage smolders in meetings where officials redraw precincts to dilute African American voting strength or seek to slash the government payrolls that have long served as sources of black employment. It goes virtually unnoticed, however, because white rage doesn’t have to take to the streets and face rubber bullets to be heard. Instead, white rage carries an aura of respectability and has access to the courts, police, legislatures and governors, who cast its efforts as noble, though they are actually driven by the most ignoble motivations.

White rage recurs in American history. It exploded after the Civil War, erupted again to undermine the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision and took on its latest incarnation with Barack Obama’s ascent to the White House. For every action of African American advancement, there’s a reaction, a backlash.

lovestodeepthroat:

soulbrotherv2:

Sexual Relations Between Elite White Women and Enslaved Men in the Antebellum South: A Socio-Historical Analysis

By Jacqueline M. Allain
Sexual Agency, Power, and Consent
According to one historian, “few scholars… have viewed the relationships of enslaved men and free white women through the lens of sexual abuse in part because of gendered assumptions about sexual power” (Foster, p. 459). This is in keeping with both the standard feminist conceptualization of rape as a tool of patriarchal oppression3 as well as the traditional (un-feminist) notion of women as too weak, emotionally and physically, to commit serious crimes, let alone sexual abuse, and the idea that men cannot be raped (Bourke, 2007, pp. 219, 328). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that women, too, are capable of committing sexual offenses and using sex as a means of domination and control (Bourke, pp. 209-248).

[Continue reading at Student Pulse:  The International Student Journal.]


Yup.

lovestodeepthroat:

soulbrotherv2:

Sexual Relations Between Elite White Women and Enslaved Men in the Antebellum South: A Socio-Historical Analysis

By Jacqueline M. Allain

Sexual Agency, Power, and Consent

According to one historian, “few scholars… have viewed the relationships of enslaved men and free white women through the lens of sexual abuse in part because of gendered assumptions about sexual power” (Foster, p. 459). This is in keeping with both the standard feminist conceptualization of rape as a tool of patriarchal oppression3 as well as the traditional (un-feminist) notion of women as too weak, emotionally and physically, to commit serious crimes, let alone sexual abuse, and the idea that men cannot be raped (Bourke, 2007, pp. 219, 328). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that women, too, are capable of committing sexual offenses and using sex as a means of domination and control (Bourke, pp. 209-248).

[Continue reading at Student Pulse:  The International Student Journal.]

Yup.